About Us

Runamok Maple produces infused, smoked and barrel-aged maple syrup along with our pure maple, which we call, Sugarmaker’s Cut. We love pure maple syrup but have discovered that the potential for taking it in new directions is limitless.  Maple marries exceptionally well with a variety of flavors. Some of them are tried and true like cinnamon and vanilla and some are unexpectedly out of this world, like our original Makrut lime-leaf. And our barrel-aged syrups have taken this North American treasure to a whole other level.

We are constantly working on new recipes to highlight the unique flavors in our syrups, and have gathered them here, on our website, for you to try.  We hope you will explore it for ideas as well as information about our operation.

You can also follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

Best,
Eric and Laura Sorkin

Sustainability + Social Responsibility

But our forests do not exist in a bubble.  We tend to think globally with every decision we make both at our plant and in the sugarbush.  The solar panels on our product facility’s rooftop will reduce our carbon footprint. The habitat we preserve will make for excellent homes for migratory birds, as well as indigenous wildlife. Our compostable cups cut down on plastic in landfills. The post-infused ingredients and barrels we pass along to other food and beverage producers help reduce food waste.  And every single tree in our sugarbush will act as the lungs for the biosphere, taking in excess carbon and breathing out oxygen. 

We love that we have a working landscape that provides not only one of the finest ingredients from North America but also a natural air filter that is tipping the carbon ratio in the right direction. We aim to be not only good environmental stewards of our land but also for the planet.

The Sugarbush

Maintaining a productive sugarbush requires a lot of hands-on, manual labor. The process starts in mid-winter when the trees are tapped by drilling a small hole in the trunk of a sugar or red maple and inserting a spout. When spring finally arrives and the temperature rises above freezing during the day, the sap starts to run. It comes out as a slow drip from the tap and flows into tubing that is connected to a network which runs throughout the forest, ending in huge tanks. The entire network is on a vacuum system to keep the sap flowing. Each year is a guessing game as to how long the sap will run. It may go on and off for ten weeks or it could run for just a few days before the weather warms up too much and the season comes to an abrupt end.

The Sugarhouse

Once the sap comes into the sugarhouse, it is concentrated through a reverse osmosis machine and boiled down to syrup. The boiling process is intense and the hours are long. When there are roughly six weeks to make a year’s worth of product, there is no stopping and starting mid-run to catch some sleep. It’s an art in endurance and on-the-job problem-solving. Once the syrup has reached the proper concentration, it is filtered and stored in barrels.

Our Team

Eric Sorkin

Co-Owner + CEO

Laura Sorkin

Co-Owner

Curt Alpeter

President + Partner

The Runamok Crew

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